Waste To Energy

Our company consults and arranges turn-key Waste to Energy solutions based on a sophisticated ‘last generation technology’

As a technology agnostic company we are able to draw on deep technical understanding and strategic alliances with both proven and up and coming technology. At present our technology portfolio comprises:

Thermal Solutions

  • Gasification
  • Plasma Arc
  • Plasma gasification
  • Advanced Pyrolysis & Torrefaction
  • Incineration

Non-thermal

  • AD/composting
  • Landfill Remediation and Landfill Mining
  • PV
  • Wind
  • Wave
  • Hydo

Waste profiles

  • MSW
  • RDF/SRF
  • Hazardous Waste

A World of Energy Policy Contradiction, Uncertainty and Unattractive Options

Fuelling the world is a headache for policy makers. Whilst many resource thirsty countries, particularly India and China are chasing fossil fuels wherever they can, the more developed world is grappling to shape effective and coherent energy policies and find balance between ‘green’ and ‘practical’.

Policy leaders are having to focus on the rather existential and politically correct (wind, solar, geothermal) rather than the abundant and practical (oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear). But ‘green’ does not come cheap nor does it bring impressive commercial results or levels of efficiency. Wind, solar and geothermal all require considerable government support through grants, credits, loan guarantees or subsidies if they are to be commercially viable – as has been proven with the Solar and Wind sectors which died temporarily when the subsidies were withdrawn. Meanwhile, Nuclear has its own special safety and environmental issues, which we were reminded of most recently in 2011 in Japan and requires huge state funding. Coal, on the other hand, is cheap and readily available, but is very much a ‘dirty’ word in green energy terms.

As regards oil and gas, improved detection, drilling and extraction methods are keeping exploitable reserves high, and cheap gas from utilising new technologies to fracture shale formations is greatly adding to the supply of hydrocarbon sources for energy. But all carry an environmental price tag that many feel is unpalatable.

Once political unrest in the third world producing nations of Africa and the Middle East is stirred into the mix with all the other factors, with the knock-on effect on global prices as supplies are suddenly put at risk, medium term energy policy making and implementation becomes a political headache and almost impossible to achieve the right balance between votes, subsidies, costs to the consumer and the environment.